Publications

Featured Publication

Displaying 2 - 2 of 2

Pages

2010
in J. Brockman (Ed.), This will change everything: Ideas that will shape the future, Harper, p. 88 (2010).
2010
with Dirk Schulze-Makuch, Journal of Cosmology 12, 189 (2010).
2010
(with Niels Henrik Gregersen) Cambridge University Press (2010)
2010
Example copy for this lecture.
2010
Fifty years ago, a young astronomer named Frank Drake pointed a radio telescope at nearby stars in the hope of picking up a signal from an alien civilization. Thus began one of the boldest scientific projects in history -- the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). But after a half-century of scanning the skies, astronomers have little to report but an eerie silence -- eerie, because many scientists are convinced that the universe is teeming with life. The problem could be that we've been looking in the wrong place, at the wrong time, and in the wrong way. In this book I offer a new and exciting roadmap for SETI’s future, arguing that we need to be far more expansive in our efforts, by questioning existing ideas of what form an alien intelligence might take, how it might try to communicate with us, and how we should respond if we ever do make contact. It will appeal to fans of science and science fiction alike.Publication Details:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2010) U.S.A. Penguin Books (2010) U.K.
2010
Life’s origin remains one of the greatest scientific mysteries. Recent discoveries in astrobiology suggest that life might have started on Mars and come to Earth in rocks blasted off the Red Planet by comet impacts. The discovery of microbes living deep underground or round scalding volcanic vents on the sea bed supports the idea that life began in an exotic locale. 
2010
Life’s origin remains one of the greatest scientific mysteries. Recent discoveries in astrobiology suggest that life might have started on Mars and come to Earth in rocks blasted off the Red Planet by comet impacts. The discovery of microbes living deep underground or round scalding volcanic vents on the sea bed supports the idea that life began in an exotic locale. 
2010
Life’s origin remains one of the greatest scientific mysteries. Recent discoveries in astrobiology suggest that life might have started on Mars and come to Earth in rocks blasted off the Red Planet by comet impacts. The discovery of microbes living deep underground or round scalding volcanic vents on the sea bed supports the idea that life began in an exotic locale. 
2009
in S. J. Dick and M. L. Lupisella (Ed.), Cosmos and Culture, NASA Press, p. 383 (2009). 
2009
Guardian Online, (23 December 2009).
2009
interview with Astronomy Now, (14 December 2009).
2009
Guardian Online, (16 September 2009).
2009
Astrobiology Magazine Online, (25 May 2009).
2009
Forskning & Framsteg (Sweden), 10 (March 2009).
2009
La Recherche 427, 31 (February 2009).
2009
with S. Benner, C. Cleland, C. Lineweaver, C. McKay and F. Wolfe-Simon, Astrobiology 9 (2), (2009).
2009
Focus 198, 27 (January 2009).
2009
with A. Anbar and F. Wolfe-Simon, International Journal of Astrobiology 8, 69 (2009).
2008
with M. Rees, M. Tegmark, A. Guth and A. Linde in Closer to Truth: Cosmos. Consciousness. God. Season 1, Episode 2 (2008). 
2008
with J. A. Leslie, S. Weinberg, D. Gross, J. Polkinghorne and R. Collins in Closer to Truth: Cosmos. Consciousness. God. Season 1, Episode 7 (2008). 
2008
 interview with Niezbednik Inteligenta (Poland) 42, 19 (2008).
2008
Enlightenment Magazine 40, 82 (May-July 2008).
2008
 by Leonard Susskind, Nature 454, 579 (2008).
2008
 interview in Ciel & Espace 457, 38 (June 2008).
2008
Seed Magazine, (June 2008).
2008
The Australian, (9 May 2008).
2008
in R. Dawkins (Ed.), The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing, Oxford University Press, p. 323 (2008). 

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