Publications

Featured Publication

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1
2006
Times Higher Education Supplement, (13 October 2006).
2006
Times Higher Education Supplement, (10 March 2006).
2006
The Daily Telegraph, (21 September 2006).
2006
Oxford Times, (28 September 2006).
2006
by Ray Kurzweil, Nature 440, 421 (2006).
2006
by Leonard Susskind and James Lindesay, Australian Physics 43, 29 (2006).
2006
by Colin Keay, Australian Physics 42, 207 (2006).
2006
with E. V. Pikuta, R. B. Hoover, B. Klyce and P. A. Davies, in Proceedings of SPIE’s 47th annual meeting, San Diego, p. 63090A (August 2006). 
2006
Joan Bakewell (Ed.), UK: Duckworth Publishers, (2006).
2006
in Proceedings of SPIE’s 47th annual meeting, San Diego, p. 630908 (August 2006).   
2006
Science & Theology News, (April 2006).
2006
in J. Staune (Ed.), Science and the Search for Meaning, Templeton Foundation Press, p. 27 (2006). 
2006
in J. Brockman (Ed.), My Einstein, New York: Pantheon Books, p. 223 (2006). 
2006
Espacio, 35 (February 2006).
2006
New Scientist, 48 (11 February 2006).
2006
by Jack Bacon, Houston: Normandy House (2006).
2006
in T. Peters (Ed.), God’s Action in Nature’s World: Essays in honor of Robert J. Russell, United Kingdom: Ashgate Publishing, p. 217 (2006). 
2006
interview, English.ohmynews.com, (17 January 2006).
2006
by J.G. Roederer (Springer 2005) in Australian Physics 42, 170 (2006).
2006
P. Clayton (Ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press (2006).  
2006
in P. Clayton and P. Davies (Ed.), The Re-Emergence of Emergence, Oxford University Press, p. 35 (2006).
2006
(with Philip Clayton) Oxford University Press (2006)
2006
For thousands of years, human beings have gazed in wonder at the world about them and asked the big questions: How did the universe come to exist? What is it made of? Where do human beings fit in? Is there some sort of meaning behind the great cosmic scheme of things? In my latest book, I have a stab at answering all of them! To organize this ambitious task, I focus on the really big question that is currently preoccupying many scientists: Why does the universe seem to be so bio-friendly? Many different aspects of the cosmos, from the properties of the humble carbon atom to the speed of light, seem almost tailor-made to encourage biology. Like Baby Bear's porridge in the story of Goldilocks, the universe looks "just right" for life. In fact, it looks like a fix. So what is going on? One theory says it's because our universe is just one of an infinite number of universes, each one slightly different, and that our particular universe is bio-friendly by accident; we just happened to win the cosmic jackpot. While this "multiverse" explanation is popular, it has bizarre implications, from infinite copies of each of us to Matrix-like simulated universes. And it still leaves a lot unexplained. I think there's a more satisfying solution to the problem of existence: that the explanation for the universe lies entirely within it. To make this work - to avoid appealing to anything outside the universe - it's necessary to assume that the observations we make today help shape the nature of reality in the remote past. This sounds weird, but it finds a natural place in the physicist's arsenal of explanations, especially when quantum effects are taken into account. If I'm right, then life-and, ultimately, consciousness-aren't just incidental byproducts of nature, but central players hard-wired into the evolution of the universe. Even if you don't buy my ultimate explanation of existence, you will find plenty of mainstream science here, including an accessible account of all that's new and exciting in cosmology and fundamental physics, some stuff on string theory (or M theory), the hunt for new subatomic particles, and much else.  ----------------------------- Publication Details: Allen Lane, the Penguin Press (2006) Published in the USA by Houghton Mifflin under the title Cosmic Jackpot, (2007)
2005
The Guardian, (20 December 2005).
2005
New Scientist, 51 (29 October 2005).
2005
by Helen Joyce in Plus Magazine at plus.maths.org, 36, (September 2005).
2005
The Guardian, (8 September 2005).
2005
by Lisa Randall in Nature 435, 1161 (June 2005).
2005
by P. Clancy, A. Brack and G. Horneck, New Scientist, 50 (25 June 2005).
2005
in Science & Spirit, 60 (May/June 2005).

Pages